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2013 PCNA Fall Program - Series I

Educational objectives:
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:

Secondary Prevention of CVD: Best Practices Based on the Evidence (50% pharm)

  • Distinguish the pharmacologic profiles of current U. S. approved oral antiplatelet therapies. Identify strategies to promote adherence of secondary prevention recommendations for CVD. 
  • Summarize current evidence-based pharmacologic recommendations in secondary prevention of CVD 

Safe and Effective Dyslipidemia Management in Patients with Diabetes (DM) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) (75% pharm)
  • Describe common lipid abnormalities in patients with DM or CKD. 
  • Identify recommendations for dosing adjustments in statin therapy for these patients. 
  • Apply evidence based recommendations for dyslipidemia therapy in these patients. 

Lost in Transition: Keeping Heart Failure Patients from Falling Through the Cracks (0 % pharm)
  • Identify the clinical presentation and appropriate diagnostic tests for systolic (HFrEF) and diastolic heart failure (HFpEF). 
  • Identify the barriers that deter effective self care management in heart failure patients. 
  • Apply transition of care strategies in a heart failure case study.

2013 PCNA Fall Program - Series II

Educational objectives:
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:

Contemporary Identification and Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia (40% pharm)

  • Describe the clinical presentation of the individual with familial hypercholesterolemia, including physical exam and laboratory findings. 
  • Summarize current therapies available for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. 

Heart Healthy Lifestyle Counseling: A Focus on the Female Patient (0% pharm)
  • Identify two pregnancy complications associated with future CVD risk. 
  • Describe the integration of brief dietary counseling into a clinical visit. 
  • Apply evidence-based interventions to promote physical activity and healthy eating including the PCNA Heart Healthy Toolbox. 

Decreasing Stroke Risk in the Patient with Atrial Fibrillation: Current Options (100% pharm)
  • Review the guidelines for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) in the patient with atrial fibrillation. 
  • Summarize prescribing information for the oral anticoagulants approved for stroke prophylaxis in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. 

2014 PCNA Pharmacology Pre-Conference
Join us for an exciting new pre-conference session designed especially for advanced practice nurses to help meet the new renewal of certification requirements. We have assembled a team of 3 NPs who are thought leaders in cardiovascular nursing, along with a PharmD colleague to present 4 important topics in a clinically relevant and engaging format. This course will incorporate pre-course self-paced review/self-assessment and post-course assessment to provide a total of 7 contact hours in pharmacology!
Acute Coronary Syndrome: Safe Transition to Home...and Health, July 30, 2014

For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the transition from inpatient to outpatient care can be an especially vulnerable period because of the complex medical regimens and the multiple clinicians involved in their care.

Cardiovascular Health: What Does Stress Have to Do With It?
Stress can impact cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a variety of ways, through its effect on the sympathetic nervous system and hemostasis and via the effect of stress on behaviors such as eating and tobacco use.  A topic we typically hear more about in February - the "broken heart syndrome" - is often described as the ultimate expression of stress on the heart.  It is key for nurses, nurse practitioners, and dietitians who work with patients on adopting and maintaining heart-healthy behaviors to understand the impact of stress on the cardiovascular system and on CVD risk factors. Evidence-based stress management techniques are important to facilitating behavior change and to improving overall quality of life.  

Plan to join us for PCNA's February program "Cardiovascular Health: What Does Stress Have to Do With It?" on February 22 at 1:00 pm ET.  Program faculty include Dr. Joanne Foody MD, Director of the Cardiovascular Wellness Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Catherine Christie, PhD, RD, Associate Dean, Brooks College of Health & Nutrition Graduate Program Director University of North Florida. Drs. Foody and Christie will discuss the impact of stress on CVD through direct physiologic effects as well as through the impact of stress on health behaviors - especially eating behaviors. They will offer tips on helping patients with evidence-based stress management techniques. Time will be allotted for questions.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  • Identify the two basic pathways by which stress impacts cardiovascular disease risk
  • Define 2 indicators suggesting that excessive stress is  playing a role in a patient's difficulty initiating and maintaining healthy lifestyle changes.
  • List 3 evidence-based stress management techniques to recommend to a patient experiencing difficulty coping with work stress.
  • Identify an indication for referral to a mental health professional.

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 


NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation February  22, 2012
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Caring for a Woman's Heart: Setting the Stage for Family Health
"By increasing heart disease awareness and education for women, we could ultimately improve the long term heart-health of entire families and that of generations to come."  - Dr. JoAnne Foody 

Join JoAnne M. Foody, MD, FACC, FAHA, Director, Cardiovascular Wellness Program, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, and Kathy Berra, MSN, ANP, FAANP, FAAN, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, for this informative and thought-provoking presentation on women and cardiovascular health. 

Program topics include a discussion of the important role that women play in influencing the heart-health of their family and community, strategies to assess and stratify women into high risk, at risk, and optimal risk categories for cardiovascular disease, and evidence-based approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention for patients with hypertension, lipid abnormalities, and diabetes.  Both presentations will stress the importance of lifestyle approaches to the prevention of cardiovascular disease in women. The new Women and Heart Disease Guidelines from the American Heart Association (released February 14, 2011) will also be discussed, with a focus on implications for patient care. 

Dr. Foody and Kathy Berra have both dedicated their professional careers to improving recognition that heart disease is a major women's health issue. They are committed to finding ways to increase women's awareness of their heart disease risk, teaching women how to recognize and act on symptoms, and to identify effective ways of implementing heart-healthy lifestyle programs for women and their families. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
At the conclusion of this program, attendees will be able to:
  1. Explain key elements of the new American Heart Association Women and Heart Disease guidelines. 
  2. Discuss how improving heart disease awareness and education among women could ultimately improve the long-term health of their families by influencing health behaviors.
  3. Describe barriers and motivators for women in supporting heart-healthy lifestyles for themselves and their families.
  4. Define ways that health professionals can support women in their pursuit of personal and family heart-health.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation February  23, 2011
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Creating a Heart-Healthy Workplace: The Job Begins with Us!
Nurses, advanced practice nurses and dietitians can be change leaders, creating work environments in which the healthy thing to do is the easy thing to do. Join us for "Creating a Heart-Healthy Workplace: The Job Begins with Us!" Two thought leaders in the healthy work environments will identify the challenges to optimal cardiovascular health habits of health care professionals, and pose solutions to the unique challenges posed by the kind of work we do. Learn ways to incorporate physical activity into your work day, advocate for healthy choices in your cafeteria, and inspire your colleagues to move with you in the right direction toward optimal cardiovascular health.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
At the conclusion of this program, attendees will be able to:
  1. Identify healthy lifestyle challenges of RNs and RDs, and other shift workers.
  2. Identify the benefits of a healthy work environment – such as reduced healthcare costs and absenteeism, presenteeism, increased satisfaction, and improved patient care. 
  3. Describe the role of the RN and RD as educator, advocate, and role model, to empower health, safety, and wellness personally and within the work environment, using the socio-ecologic model.
  4. Provide a quick reframing tool to help identify healthy options to health lifestyle challenges.
  5. Describe successful "wellness at work" initiatives, including those that support healthy eating and physical activity/exercise, with a focus on the hospital setting. 

AUDIENCE:
The audience for this course consists of nurse practitioners, nurses, and dietitians and others specializing in cardiovascular disease prevention and management. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation May 15, 2013
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014
Energy Balance in an Obese World: Science & Clinical Applications
The concept of "energy balance" is a critical concept for understanding and devising solutions to the obesity epidemic. Energy balance is usually defined by the simple equation, "energy in = energy out." However, research suggests that energy balance is not so simple. Instead, it is influenced by complex interactions and adjustments by the body in response to calories consumed, physical activity, individual biology, the environment and more. 

Please join obesity experts James O. Hill, PhD, and Keith-Thomas Ayoob, EdD, RD, FADA, for a real-world look at energy balance and obesity, as well as strategies to use with your overweight patients and clients.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
  • Define the concept of energy balance
  • Understand how the components of energy balance are interrelated
  • Contrast approaches to treating vs. preventing obesity
  • Describe how an understanding of energy balance can help us develop strategies to reduce obesity. 

AUDIENCE: 
The audience for this course consists of nurse practitioners, nurses, and dietitians and others specializing in cardiovascular disease prevention and management. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation February  8, 2012
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014


Evaluation of Cardiac Symptoms in Women with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease
Join us for a case-based discussion about the gender differences in pathophysiology, risk factors, and clinical presentation of cardiovascular disease in women. This presentation will explore the evaluation of cardiac symptoms in women, including non-invasive and invasive imaging and emerging risk markers and will include benefits, limitations, risks and cost when choosing diagnostic strategies. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
  • Review the evidence for gender differences in cardiovascular disease pathophysiology, risk factors (i.e. pregnancy complications), and clinical presentation (atypical sx, tendency to delay). 
  • Summarize the evidence of gender differences in the utility of diagnostic strategies used to rule out obstructive coronary disease: including accuracy, limitations, cost burden and potential risk(s) associated with each testing modality- both noninvasive as well as invasive.  

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, advanced practice nurses, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation November 29, 2012
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Exercise is Medicine: Practical Examples to Help Get Your Patients Moving!
Join Adrian Hutber, PhD, American College of Sports Medicine's Vice President, Exercise is Medicine™ and Jane Nelson Worel MSN, APRN-BC, APNP, FAHA, FPCNA, board member of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association for this lively presentation on the evidence supporting the health benefits of physical activity and the role of health professionals in Exercise is Medicine (EIM). Exercise is Medicine is a new global initiative started by the American College of Sports Medicine and supported in partnership with the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA). Dr. Hutber will provide an overview of the EIM program and Ms. Nelson Worel will discuss prescribing exercise to patients, using a case study format to illustrate the many resources found in the EIM Toolkit for Nurses, available at www.exerciseismedicine.org.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
At the conclusion of this program, attendees will be able to:
  1. Explain the impact of physical activity in terms of:
    - Disease prevention
    - Reduction in mortality rates (especially DM and cancer)
    - Positive effects in older adults and children
    - Exercise as a clinical intervention for disease
    - Beneficial effect of muscle strength on health outcomes
  2. Describe the key components of a beneficial exercise program and how to prescribe exercise in a clinical setting using resources found in the EIM toolkit.
  3. Explain how to incorporate physical activity as a vital sign and utilize this information to enhance patient care.
  4. Implement a health promotion model into their practice that includes routine encouragement toward an active lifestyle.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation October 28, 2010
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Exercise is Medicine: Understanding the Evidence
What if doctors gave your patients one prescription that could prevent and treat dozens of diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity? Would you work with your patients to promote compliance? 
 - Robert Sallis, M.D. FACSM, Chairman, Exercise Is Medicine, and Past-President of the American College of Sports Medicine 

Join Exercise is Medicine founder and American College of Sports Medicine past president, Dr. Robert E. Sallis for this lively presentation on the growing evidence supporting the health benefits of physical activity and the role of health professionals in Exercise is Medicine (EIM).  Exercise is Medicine is a new global initiative started by the American College of Sports Medicine and supported in partnership with the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA).  Dr. Sallis will discuss the EIM program and how to make physical activity assessment and exercise prescription a standard part of the disease prevention and treatment paradigm for all patients. Joining the program will also be moderator, Jane Nelson Worel, President of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, who will discuss PCNA’s new partnership with EIM and efforts to make the EIM tool kit valuable for nurses.


EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
At the conclusion of this lecture, attendees will be able to:
  1. Explain the impact of physical activity in terms of:
    - Prevention of disease
    - Reduction in mortality rates (especially DM and cancer)
    - Positive effects in the older adults and kids
    - Exercise as a clinical intervention for disease
    - Beneficial effect of muscle strength on health outcomes
  2. Describe the key components of a beneficial exercise program and how to prescribe exercise in a clinical setting.
  3. Explain how to incorporate physical activity as a vital sign and utilize this information to enhance patient care.
  4. Implement a health promotion model into their practice that includes routine encouragement toward an active lifestyle.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation December 9, 2009
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014
Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Counseling: Making the Clinical Encounter More Efficient-and Effective
Making and sustaining changes in dietary habits, physical activity levels and smoking cessation are integral components of reducing cardiovascular disease risk, specifically in reaching target blood pressure, weight, and lipid goals. Providing the information, support and tools to patients in a brief clinical encounter can pose a difficult challenge for nurses, advanced practice nurses, dietitians, and exercise specialists. These challenges commonly present as gaps in the availability of time, easily accessible tools, or expertise. Join us for Healthy Lifestyle Change: Making the Clinical Encounter More Efficient-and Effective on February 27 @ 12 noon CT for an important web-based presentation which will explore common challenges, practical solutions, and a new collection of simple tools and resources to support your work and your patients' efforts. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
  • Describe the integration of brief dietary counseling into a clinical visit.
  • Define the concept of "exercise is medicine."
  • Demonstrate how patient education tools can be used to supplement the clinical encounter

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, advanced practice nurses, dietitians, exercise specialists

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation February  27, 2013
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Intuitive Eating: Creating a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind, and Body
Plan to join us as PCNA presents Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD as she presents a topic well-known to her, Intuitive Eating: Creating a Healthy Relationship with Food, Mind, and Body. Ms. Tribole, who has published widely on the concept of Intuitive Eating, will integrate both science and case studies in this one hour presentation. Special attention will be paid to three challenging and sometimes controversial areas:
  • Why permission to eat any food is an important component for creating a healthy relationship with food, mind, and body. 
  • How dieting harms a person's relationship with food, mind, and body.
  • How to overcome obstacles to intuitive eating: dieting, body dissatisfaction, and distraction.
This session will provide pearls of information and practical tips to nurses, advanced practice nurses, and nutrition professionals who work to help patients change eating behaviors and create healthier relationships with food with the goal of improving cardiovascular and overall health. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  1. Describe three evidence-based benefits of Intuitive Eating.
  2. List three reasons why having permission to eat any food can improve health.
  3. Describe two reasons the dieting process harms a person's relationship to food and body.

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation January 24, 2012
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014


Mindset: A New Strategy for Health Behavior Change
Does it seem as though your patients know what they need to do to improve their health but still do not do it? Attend this webinar and gain insight into behavior and learn how to help your patients implement positive changes. This course will introduce and describe the technique of Mindset and other strategies that can assist individuals in health behavior change. A Fixed Mindset involves the belief that one's qualities and abilities are set in stone, whereas a Growth Mindset is the belief that one can develop those qualities and abilities. Mindset will be compared with current lifestyle behavior theories and models to provide a "toolkit" of strategies in health behavior change. A case scenario will be presented to demonstrate the use of these strategies, including lifestyle change tools to promote effective patient health behavior change. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  1. List at least two characteristics of the Fixed and Growth Mindsets, and explain how a Fixed Mindset makes change and maintenance difficult.
  2. Describe Mindset as a technique to effectively engage individuals in health behavior change.
  3. Compare and contrast Mindset with other behavior change theories to provide a variety of effective health behavior change strategies.
  4. Integrate Mindset techniques and other health behavior change tools into clinical practice, to assist individuals in health behavior change and improve health outcomes.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation September 9, 2009
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014
Motivational Interviewing in Action: Skills & Tools to Enhance Change in Physical Activity Behavior
Join Julie Schwartz, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, ACSM-HFS, Nutri-Well Coaching, and Lola Coke, PhD, APRN-BC, ACNS, FAHA, FPCNA, board member of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association for this lively presentation on the principles of motivational interviewing and other behavior change tools. Every healthcare professional needs a "toolkit" of different behavior change strategies to deal with diverse populations of patients. This presentation will assist healthcare professionals to utilize these tools when working with patients to increase physical activity. The program will include a role play scenario to demonstrate motivational interviewing principles. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
At the conclusion of this program, attendees will be able to:
  1. Utilize two motivational interviewing principles with patients to promote physical activity behavior change.
  2. Discuss how additional behavior change strategies can be used with patients to increase physical activity.
  3. Implement tools to help patients evolve from an inactive to an active lifestyle, meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation September 14, 2009
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014


Move It! Update from the Activity Side of the Energy Balance Equation - Plus Strategies To Get Your Clients Off The Couch
This course will address the latest research in the fitness/fatness debate and the growing support for the role of physical activity in promoting healthful aging and preventing serious diseases, including heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, plus effective strategies for motivating clients to put more physical activity into their daily lives.  

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  1. Utilize data from two (2) large clinical trials to explain the benefits of adhering to an exercise routine.
  2. Discuss the effects of an exercise program on chronic conditions such as excessive body weight, cancer, and depression.
  3. Instruct clients or patients in ways to overcome common barriers to exercise.

AUDIENCE: 
Nursing, nutritionists, and other healthcare providers.

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation September 23, 2008
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Never Too Early, Never Too Late: Cardiovascular Health for Women Throughout the Lifespan
Women have contact with the healthcare system at important touch points throughout the lifespan. These clinical encounters - during the childbearing years, in the perimenopausal period and in later life - resent opportunities that could be leveraged to include, and, when indicated, focus on CVD risk reduction. The Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women - 011 Update (A Guideline From the American Heart Association) highlights the fact that women who have had pregnancy complications are at increased risk of CVD. The goal for this session is for clinicians to explore and optimize these opportunities in their clinical practice settings, and to champion them with their colleagues in the primary care and women's health fields. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Summarize the evidence that gestational diabetes, pregnancy-associated hypertension and preeclampsia predict future CVD risk.
  • Cite the prevalence of hypertension in women vs. men throughout the lifespan.
  • Identify sex differences with regard to tobacco use and cessation.
  • Summarize the impact (in women) of physical activity level on cardiovascular risk.
  • Describe successful cardiovascular health improvement programs targeted to women in a variety of age cohorts.

AUDIENCE:
This course is intended for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation August 14, 2013
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Patient Advocacy in Post-Hospitalization Care of ACS: Closing Communication Gaps and Engaging Patients

  • Release date: June 13, 2014
  • Expiration date: June 12, 2015
  • Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour. 
  • Please click the following link to confirm: http://pcna.peachnewmedia.com/SystemCheckv2/
  • Jointly sponsored/Co-provided by Postgraduate Institute for Medicine, PCNA, and CE Health Interactive
  • This activity is supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca

Target Audience

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians, advanced practice nurses and nurses who work in acute cardiac care settings, ambulatory cardiology practices, cardiac rehabilitation, case management, and primary care, as well as other specialists including cardiologists, primary care clinicians, hospitalists, intensivists, and emergency medicine specialists, involved in the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).


Statement of Need/Program Overview


Adherence to professional guidelines by healthcare professionals in the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains suboptimal despite the fact that the implementation of professional guidelines into treatment strategies has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with ACS post-hospitalization. In addition, patient adherence to therapy is also suboptimal. Clinicians can improve patient adherence by learning about patient-related factors of nonadherence to therapy and addressing those factors with their patients. Several methods for effectively addressing patient- and provider-related barriers to adherence that support long-term treatment goals through improved adherence rates have been developed. Advancements in antiplatelet therapy that are aimed at increasing adherence through improved efficacy and safety profiles continue; however, several barriers to their use and implementation exist, including the volume of information available to clinicians. Barriers to the effective use of these agents is multi-layered and requires educational initiatives to provide healthcare practitioners with a working knowledge of the agents available, as well as those on the horizon, so that guideline adherence and the use of effective agents can increase, thereby improving patient outcomes.

 

Educational Objectives


After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:

  • Objective #1: Implement evidence-based options recommended in professional guidelines for antithrombotic therapy in ACS patients.
  • Objective #2: Use achieved knowledge of antithrombotic options to manage ACS patients post-hospitalization.
  • Objective #3: Identify issues involving communication gaps between patient advocates and patients diagnosed with ACS.
  • Objective #4: Apply practical solutions for improving communications to effectively counsel ACS patients on medication access, the importance of long term persistence with therapy, and local pharmacy communications. 

Physician Continuing Medical Education
Accreditation Statement
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Postgraduate Institute for Medicine and CE Health Interactive. The Postgraduate Institute for Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation
The Postgraduate Institute for Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Continuing Education
This educational activity is provided by the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA). PCNA is approved as a provider of nurse practitioner continuing education (CE) programs by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), provider number 030602. 

Nurses – How to Claim Credit
Nurse and nurse practitioner learners will view the course materials; complete the post-test (post-test can be taken more than once to achieve a passing score of 75%); the CE evaluation and may then print the CE certificate.


Physicians – How to Claim Credit
Please go online to CME University at: www.cmeuniversity.com, and register or login (takes less than 1 minute).
Once logged in, follow these steps:
  • Click on the “Find Post-Test/Evaluation by Course:” at the top of the page.
  • Type in “9669” and hit enter.
  • Click on the activity title when it appears.
  • Choose your profession/type of credit you are seeking.
  • Complete the online posttest and Evaluation Form.
Upon successful completion of the posttest, 70% or better, and the online Evaluation form, you will have immediate access to a certificate of attendance to print or save for your files.
If you have any questions regarding the CME certification for this activity, please contact Postgraduate Institute for Medicine at: information@pimed.com or (303) 799-1930.

Podiums, Posters and Publishing: Sharing Your Work
Nurses, especially nurse leaders, have an obligation to the profession and to society to share their knowledge and experience through presenting and publishing. Our voices need to be heard. If our collective work is not disseminated, it remains invisible. This educational program provides strategies for the successful design, development and completion of three types of media for sharing one's knowledge: through poster displays, writing publishable papers, and giving podium presentations.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to: 
  1. Describe key approaches for preparing an effective oral presentation.
  2. Identify required components to be displayed on a poster exhibit.
  3. Describe the steps in writing a "publishable" paper.

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare professionals interested in disseminating their work through presenting and publishing.

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation July 30, 2010
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014


Promoting Healthy Bones: Sorting Out the Science
According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, there was nearly a 25% increase in hip fractures worldwide between 1990 and 2000 and by 2050 the worldwide incidence of hip fracture is projected to increase by 240% in women and 310% in men. In addition, in women over 45 years of age, osteoporosis accounts for more days spent in hospital than many other diseases, including diabetes, myocardial infarction and breast cancer.  

What's causing these declines in bone health and what can be done? It's well-known that meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D is critical for bone health—but is this enough? Are supplements necessary? What is the role of other nutrients like protein or beverage ingredients like caffeine and phosphoric acid? 

Join Dr. Robert P. Heaney, noted bone health expert and Creighton University Professor of Medicine, for a review of the research related to lifestyle factors that impact bone health, including diet, supplement use and physical activity. Learn why taking a "mono-nutrient" approach when addressing bone health issues is usually wrong, as well as how clinical studies on the impact of caffeine, phosphoric acid, and carbonation on calcium balance shape discussions on beverage and bone health concerns.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  • Cite two major factors contributing to poor bone health.
  • Discuss the synergy between nutrition and exercise in promoting bone health.
  • Explain the inadequacy of taking a "mono-nutrient" approach to bone health, using the impact of protein intake on calcium balance as an example.
  • Discuss clinical research findings related to the impact of caffeine, phosphoric acid and carbonation on calcium balance and bone health.

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation July 13, 2011
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Sit Less, Move More! Understanding Inactivity Physiology and Strategies to Help Patients Adopt Healthier Behaviors
This course describes the exciting news emerging from the young and rapidly growing field of "inactivity physiology" taking aim at improving health in a sedentary society and targeting some of the most common diseases caused by sedentary lifestyles. Inactivity physiology represents a paradigm shift for how we think about how lifestyle causes disease. Simply put, the inactivity physiology paradigm says that "too little exercise" is not the same as "too much sitting" (physical inactivity) and that too much sitting has very potent effects on the body contributing to the most common diseases. 

In this course, Marc Hamilton, PhD explains both the basic and applied science leading to the development of the inactivity physiology paradigm, including research suggesting that the unhealthy effects of sitting idle too much are largely independent of whether or not a person exercises. A focus will be put on the practical implications for the front line healthcare providers in order to improve medical care. This will include discussion applicable for pediatrics, preventative medicine, and geriatrics.   

Catherine Christie, PhD, RD, LD/N, FADA discusses behavior change research and offers clinical insights into effective ways healthcare professionals can help patients overcome barriers and discover physical activity self-efficacy or the willingness, ability and readiness to change. A brief review of the literature on barriers in various patient groups will be presented and possible solutions and useful materials that can be incorporated in intervention programs and when working with patients to determine their own self-efficacy for physical activity will be discussed. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:
  1. Use research findings to explain the basic tenants of the inactivity physiology paradigm, including why "too little exercise" is not the same as "too much sitting" (physical inactivity).
  2. Assess patient willingness, ability, and readiness to change physical activity behaviors.
  3. Discuss how behavior change strategies can be used with patients to reduce perceived barriers and increase physical activity. 
  4. Review tools to help patients evolve from an inactive to an active lifestyle; meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. 

AUDIENCE: 
Nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians/nutritionists, and other healthcare providers interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation April 28, 2011
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

The Obesity Paradox: Is It All About Cardiovascular Fitness?
The relationship between weight and health may be more complicated than health care professionals realize. In fact, a recent meta-analyses indicated that relative to normal weight, overweight may actually be associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality. Join us  to hear two thought leaders in the field of cardiovascular health and fitness describe the "obesity paradox," discuss the benefits of exercise independent of weight loss, and explore how (and why) being lean but unfit is dangerous to your cardiovascular health. 

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
Participants will be able to...
  • List the adverse effects of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular risk and cardiac structure/function.
  • Summarize the evidence that relative to normal weight, overweight is associated with lower all-cause mortality. 
  • Review the evidence for the benefit of exercise on cardiovascular health independent of weight loss. 
  • Identify the impact of exercise on weight loss and weight maintenance, based on frequency, intensity, type and duration. 

AUDIENCE:
The audience for this course consists of nurse practitioners, nurses, and dietitians and others specializing in cardiovascular disease prevention and management. 

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation July 13, 2013
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014

Writing Strong Abstracts for Scientific Conferences
Writing an abstract in consideration of presenting at a national conference can be a daunting task. During this presentation, information on the steps to take in preparing to write an abstract for submission will be covered. Each component of an abstract will be discussed and writing tips will be provided for each of these sections so that they are graded highly by reviewers. Multiple examples of successful abstracts will be presented to illustrate the points emphasized.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 
Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to: 
  1. Describe the steps in writing an abstract for presentation at a scientific conference.
  2. Identify three components that make an abstract strong.
  3. Use the information presented to develop a strong draft of an abstract to submit for consideration for presentation at a meeting.

AUDIENCE:
Nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare professionals interested in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease.

NOTE:
  • Original Live Presentation November 23, 2009
  • Reviewed by PCNA CE committee January 2014